5 on 5 – August 2017

I’m happy to be back in my home state! I’ve been appreciating being close to family, American grocery stores, and blue skies. This month’s five on five was inspired by small town life in Texas. Being away has changed the way I view my hometown. What once felt claustrophobic now feels quaint and peaceful. America truly is a rich country.

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Hope everyone is having a lovely weekend.

♥︎K

 

Education in Japan

Both of my parents work in education and one of the things I like about working in education myself is that now I can talk to my parents like a peer in the same industry.

Education is one of the toughest fields around. Being a teacher is easy, but being a good teacher takes years of dedication and a passion to help students. And patience. A saintly kind of patience. But before you can begin to teach, you need a student who’s willing to learn.

Now, I’ve worked in the entertainment industry in Los Angeles and dealt with a wide range of personality types. I’ve dealt with demanding clients with ridiculous expectations and even more ridiculous deadlines. It was demanding. It was stressful. But give me room of surly 10 year olds…. that’s a hell of a lot scarier.

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*No teachers or children were harmed in the making of this photo* Halloween Night

I’ve had many talks with my mom about the differences between the education system in Japan versus in Texas. Now I’m not saying Japan has all the answers, but I can tell you, my experience teaching there was a dream compared to what my parents deal with everyday.

There are a few key things I noticed in the Japanese public school system that I believe lead to stronger, more disciplined students.

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Students looking captivated by my English lesson

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1. Students walk to school

There are no buses. There is no line of parents dropping students off by car. Students are expected to walk to school rain or shine. When you reach junior high school age, then you’re allowed to ride a bicycle to school.

Now I know the distance that American students live to school makes this kind of arrangement impossible, but it’s still interesting to observe.

2. Students are greeted every morning by fellow students

When I arrived at school each day, there were 3 or 4 students whose job it was to tell me good morning and give me a high five. This is such a small gesture but it makes you feel like you are coming to a place where you are wanted. A place where you belong. I don’t know if I ever felt that while I was in school. This starts in elementary school and continues up through junior high school.

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3. Students serve each other lunch and eat in their classrooms

Each day, students wash their hands, walk to the kitchen area of the school, and pick up large pots and pans with that day’s lunch. Students carry it back up the stairs to their classroom and begin to serve food to their classmates. Other students help by handing out trays and preparing the desks.

No one can begin eating until everyone has food. Then, everyone claps their hands together and says, “Itadakimasu!” which roughly means, “I humbly accept this food” and everyone eats!

When everyone is finished, students return their trays and bowls themselves and carry it back down to the kitchen where they will be washed later by the staff.

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Photo borrowed from online

 

4. Lunch is healthy 

No french fries and pizza found here. These meals are prepared by community members (often retired grandmas) for the students from fresh ingredients. There is rarely anything with sugar. If you’re lucky, you’ll get a small piece of fruit as dessert. Students are also required to finish everything on their trays. No exceptions.

I’ve posted before about the delicious lunches I ate while in Japan. I still dream about school lunch…

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5. Students are responsible for cleaning their school

Each day, there is a 30 minute window where every student takes out a broom or a rag and cleans their school. They clean the classrooms. Their desks. The bathrooms. The hallways. The courtyards. The teacher’s room. There are no janitors. This begins as young as 1st grade.

Now most of the first graders just run through giggling and don’t really clean so an older student is assigned to help. But either way, the students learn from day 1 that this school is their property and they need to take care of it.

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Borrowed from online

6. Students perform for their parents 

At least twice a year, students host a special performance day on the weekend where family is invited to watch each student’s performance. There’s usually a song, or a play, or some kind of talent show.

Students and teachers work very hard on this performance for months. This is on top of their regular school work. Students are given a lot of responsibility for the execution of this day and they deliver.

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7. Students support their fellow students

When the 6th graders were moving on to junior high school, the students in grades 1st-5th put together the most beautiful graduation ceremony/performance for them.

They were given flower necklaces to wear. Each grade prepared a song or a dance. There were banners and speeches. There was a video made by the teachers of their photos from 1st grade until now. Anyone could see how much this small school cared about their students. I’m not going to lie, I cried like a baby. It was a beautiful ceremony.

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My adorable 6th graders

There’s a few other things like wearing summer uniforms year round in classrooms without heaters that I could add, but these are the things that come to mind at the moment.

I hope teacher’s in America realize how important their job is to the future of the world. I truly believe education can solve 95% of the world’s problems. Don’t give up. Realize that you’re not alone and connect with your fellow teacher’s. If your school isn’t supporting you, connect with teacher’s around the world! Anything that will help you realize there is a community out there who wants to help you do your job well.

 

Hang in there.

♥︎K

Austin Eats

Austin is one of my all time favorite cities. I’ve always said that if I didn’t live in Los Angeles, Austin is where you’d find me. This most recent trip opened my eyes to a city that’s growing rapidly. I think the word has gotten out that Austin is cool and people from all over the country are flocking there.

I see more and more similarities to Los Angeles each time I go. While I am not looking forward to the day Austin has the same level of traffic as LA, I do love all the delicious foods that are popping up around town. Here are some of my favorite finds.

Buddha’s Brew Kombucha

Price: $4 per 16 oz. bottle; $2.50 for refill

Where to get it: Barton Creek farmers market (if you’re in Austin) & select Whole Foods locations

Okay unless you’re already a health foods person, kombucha can be a little weird. It’s made from a fermented colony of bacteria and yeast (what?) and it’s got some floaty stuff at the bottom that looks like something a 2 year old backwashed into a jar. BUT Buddha’s Brew kombucha is something delicious.

It gets as hot as you know where by 9am during the summer in Texas and this stuff was a refreshing god send. People were queueing up to refill their jars with the various flavors that had on tap at the market. If you’re a newbie like me you can also purchase a bottle. I suggest getting at least two because you’re gonna finish one while you’re AT the farmers market and you’re gonna want another one later.

If you want to learn more about these local Austin brewers and all their delicious flavors, you can check out their site here.

Spicy Carrot Relish

Price: $10 for an 8 oz jar

Where to get it: Barton Creek farmers market (if you’re in Austin) or order online from their site

This spicy carrot relish from Moru Foods is addicting and you can put it on just about everything. We put a tablespoon in plain hummus and a bowl of greek yogurt and both transformed into a delicious dip. Take some with a bag of tortilla chips to your next party or stay home and eat it all be yourself. No judgement.

Freedmen’s Brisket Sandwich

Price: $10 lunch special

Where to Get It: 2402 San Gabriel St, Austin, TX

Freedmen’s is located in a beautiful historic building near UT’s campus. Here you can get your BBQ fix along with a number of craft cocktails. No trip to Austin is complete without eating some BBQ so I just have to do a quick shout out to my brisket sandwich. And thanks to the waitstaff for sending over a banana pudding parfait as an early birthday treat.

 

Catch y’all later.

 

K♥LA

(& TX)

Coming Back

Hello blog. Sorry I’ve been gone so long. The last month brought a lot of changes. From finding out my trip to Japan with my best friend is now going to be my first solo expedition abroad, to having work go on a 2 week project hiatus, to losing my grandpa and coming back to Texas, it’s been a little bumpy lately. My motivation to blog was one of the first things to go which is a shame because there’s something really relaxing about sending your thoughts out into the world.

I’m nearing the end of my 3rd week sans-work and I’m already getting cabin fever. Don’t get me wrong, I love spending time with my family but I also need to be working on something to feel complete. Plus I am in desperate need of a distraction from the ridiculous number of mosquito bites I’ve gotten since coming to Texas. Everything is bigger in Texas. Including the mosquitos.

So to get things rolling, here are some things that have kept me smiling throughout this roller coaster month.

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What I’m reading: Hector and the Search for Happiness

I’ll admit it…the only reason I picked up this book is because I saw the movie trailer first (I love Simon Pegg). This is a great little book about a psychiatrist who, to better help his patients, goes on a journey to find out what makes people happy. As he travels along, he writes down his discoveries in a list of lessons. Such as…

1: Making comparisons can spoil your happiness

2: Happiness often comes when least expected

It’s a great airplane read & has sparked me to starting writing my own “lessons on happiness”.

 What I’m buying: Shoes

My birthday is around the corner and one of my goals for 27 is to look more put together. I am not a fashionista by any means. If you want advice on clothes I can give you a list of other blogs you should check out. I am never going to be at their level but that’s ok! They’ve inspired me to revamp my look because it’s true, I feel more confident throughout the day when I know I look great. Besides, 27 is far enough into adulthood that I should probably get rid of my sneakers with the holes in them.

What I’m watching: Trot Lovers

I just finished watching another rom-com k-drama. This time we’ve got a story about a girl who wants to become a successful trot singer, an old-fashioned Korean music genre. It’s got all my favorite cheesy korean rom-com plot elements: the awkward ‘girl falls down and is caught by boy’ moment, the love triangle, the ‘let me save you from that falling object’ moment, the awkward hand touch… I love it all.

What I’m eating: Queso

Where do I possible begin to describe queso? It’s life changing. It’s delicious. It’s a reason to live in Texas. Since I’ve been back, I’ve been  making my rounds to different local eats to try their queso and make myself an unofficial connoisseur. More on this later.

Man…I love eating. It’s one of my top #3 favorite parts about traveling. Hope everyone is having a nice weekend!

KLA

(& TX)